Finance Professional, Conscious Black Man, Grad Student.
Observing the world. Organizing my Thoughts.
Educating, Sharing and Informing what I see.
This is my Blog. Thank you for Visiting.

22nd July 2014

Photo with 1 note

I read this the other interesting idea. I’m curious if Europe and America will just give them seats they deserve or fight the creation of this bank to further their own interests. The BRICS countries make up 20% of trade and nearly half of the world’s population but they have less power at the World Bank than Luxembourg. It’s a shame.



A rival to the World Bank?
For more What in the World watch Sundays at 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. ET on CNN
By Global Public Square staff
World leaders came together in Brazil last week to celebrate. And no, this had nothing to do with the World Cup. We’re talking about the 6th annual BRICS summit.
The leaders of all the BRICS nations – that is Vladimir Putin, Narendra Modi, Dilma Rousseff, Xi Jinping and Jacob Zuma – all gathered in Fortaleza, Brazil. And on Tuesday they sent a shot across the bow by announcing a $50 billion bank meant to rival the World Bank, and a $100 billion crisis fund to replace the IMF.
It’s clear why they made this move.
You see, these five nations – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – now account for more than 40 percent of the world’s population, almost 20 percent of the world’s total GDP and 17 percent of global trade. Yes, growth in the emerging markets has slowed recently, but these countries have still become a large enough force in the global system that they want a seat at the table.
And that hasn’t happened. Their influence in international institutions has lagged behind. Only two of the five BRICS countries have permanent seats at the U.N. Security Council. And their collective voice isn’t heard much at all at international economic institutions like the International Monetary Fund (whose head the Europeans appoint) and the World Bank (whose leader is put forth by the United States).
As The Economist points out, China – the world’s largest economy by some measures – has less voting power in the IMF and World Bank than Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxemburg. Remember, China has 1.3 billion people to the less than 30 million people in those three European nations.
The BRICS leaders have complained about this unfair treatment for years. American administrations pushed to give them greater voices and votes. But the small European countries haggled and then the American Congress has been its usual obstructionist force.
Now, instead of continuing to change the old system from within, the BRICS leaders are trying to subvert it. And this subversion comes on the 70th anniversary of Bretton Woods. That was the agreement, signed at a U.N. conference in the wilds of New Hampshire, which spawned the World Bank and the IMF in the first place.
Of course, there is all sorts of squabbling and disagreement amongst the BRICS, but there is one very important thing that they seem to agree on: they envisage an economic future that is both anti-Western, in some sense, and anti-dollar.
Welcome to the new world order, where we have to accommodate the rise of the rest. If the United States and the West don’t do that, others will create clubs of their own to counter the existing system.
The IMF has said it will collaborate with the new bank, but is that enough? Well, there’s one tangible thing the U.S. could do as soon as tomorrow: It could pass legislation to modernize and reform the IMF.
The reforms were negotiated in 2010. They are supported by almost all 188 IMF members, and just this April, the G20 gave Congress an ultimatum of sorts: pass the reforms to give emerging countries a greater say by year-end, or we will move forward without you.
Maybe the creation of this BRICS development bank will be just the wake-up call the United States Congress needs. But given that it is the United States Congress, we wouldn’t bet on it.

I read this the other interesting idea. I’m curious if Europe and America will just give them seats they deserve or fight the creation of this bank to further their own interests. The BRICS countries make up 20% of trade and nearly half of the world’s population but they have less power at the World Bank than Luxembourg. It’s a shame.

A rival to the World Bank? For more What in the World watch Sundays at 10 a.m. & 1 p.m. ET on CNN By Global Public Square staff World leaders came together in Brazil last week to celebrate. And no, this had nothing to do with the World Cup. We’re talking about the 6th annual BRICS summit. The leaders of all the BRICS nations – that is Vladimir Putin, Narendra Modi, Dilma Rousseff, Xi Jinping and Jacob Zuma – all gathered in Fortaleza, Brazil. And on Tuesday they sent a shot across the bow by announcing a $50 billion bank meant to rival the World Bank, and a $100 billion crisis fund to replace the IMF. It’s clear why they made this move. You see, these five nations – Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa – now account for more than 40 percent of the world’s population, almost 20 percent of the world’s total GDP and 17 percent of global trade. Yes, growth in the emerging markets has slowed recently, but these countries have still become a large enough force in the global system that they want a seat at the table. And that hasn’t happened. Their influence in international institutions has lagged behind. Only two of the five BRICS countries have permanent seats at the U.N. Security Council. And their collective voice isn’t heard much at all at international economic institutions like the International Monetary Fund (whose head the Europeans appoint) and the World Bank (whose leader is put forth by the United States). As The Economist points out, China – the world’s largest economy by some measures – has less voting power in the IMF and World Bank than Belgium, the Netherlands and Luxemburg. Remember, China has 1.3 billion people to the less than 30 million people in those three European nations. The BRICS leaders have complained about this unfair treatment for years. American administrations pushed to give them greater voices and votes. But the small European countries haggled and then the American Congress has been its usual obstructionist force. Now, instead of continuing to change the old system from within, the BRICS leaders are trying to subvert it. And this subversion comes on the 70th anniversary of Bretton Woods. That was the agreement, signed at a U.N. conference in the wilds of New Hampshire, which spawned the World Bank and the IMF in the first place. Of course, there is all sorts of squabbling and disagreement amongst the BRICS, but there is one very important thing that they seem to agree on: they envisage an economic future that is both anti-Western, in some sense, and anti-dollar. Welcome to the new world order, where we have to accommodate the rise of the rest. If the United States and the West don’t do that, others will create clubs of their own to counter the existing system. The IMF has said it will collaborate with the new bank, but is that enough? Well, there’s one tangible thing the U.S. could do as soon as tomorrow: It could pass legislation to modernize and reform the IMF. The reforms were negotiated in 2010. They are supported by almost all 188 IMF members, and just this April, the G20 gave Congress an ultimatum of sorts: pass the reforms to give emerging countries a greater say by year-end, or we will move forward without you. Maybe the creation of this BRICS development bank will be just the wake-up call the United States Congress needs. But given that it is the United States Congress, we wouldn’t bet on it.

Tagged: global economyimfinternational monetary fundworld bankcurrencycurrency exchangeeuEuropean Unionamericausabrazilbrasilrussiaindiachinasouth africaglobal trade systemglobal politicsglobal population

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from ...... with 42,779 notes

Great Stuff

Source: psych2go

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Jessica Morgan with 6,014 notes

minusthelove:

youngblackandvegan:

singlebride:

Check out today’s super cute 50’s themed wedding on the @Blackbride blog, captured by @La_Photographie! http://ow.ly/zjEHL

Those brides maids dresses are everything!

This is so beautiful.

Tagged: black excellenceblack loveblack marriageBlack wedding

Source: singlebride

22nd July 2014

Photo with 6 notes

Tagged: transformersautobotsdecepticonszylogo

22nd July 2014

Photo

Lol

Lol

22nd July 2014

Photo

By Career Transition Coach Andrea Abernethy
In this highly competitive job market, a well written resumé is just one tool necessary to market ourselves into a great new job. As important is the development of a personal brand.
What’s that? Think about Coke, Kellogg’s Cereals, American Express or any successful company. All these brands convey a message that helps to define them. And that’s what you need to become memorable and perhaps more importantly, to stand out among the other candidates for that job you’re chasing.
A personal brand can develop from our own mission statement. It can serve as a tagline that tells the interviewer or employer what makes us different, why we are special and desirable, and why we are the best choice over other applicants with similar backgrounds and experience. Just like Coke conveys an energy pick-up and Kellogg’s says cereal, so our brand must convey who we are and how we benefit a prospective employer.
Now use your brand to market yourself.
When developing our personal brand we should be thinking about what we want to achieve in a new job and think about what companies and positions we will be targeting. In our marketing story we should also be communicating our values and strengths and our short and long term goals. We should include words that characterize our personalities and are memorable to the employer. Communicate what makes us stand out and what sets us apart from the other applicants being interviewed for the same position.
Our brand should also include information about our skills, abilities, education, and professional experiences. Our passion and personality should show through in our statement. The personal brand may also include adjectives or descriptions of how we are perceived by friends and acquaintances and how coworkers would describe us.
So how about an example? “Early in my public relations career, I created a brand for myself (unknowingly then) based on my ability to tell stories through the news media and to build positive relationships with the press,” explains Ed Weirauch, one of our Barton Career Transition Coaches. “Without realizing it at that time, I had created a brand for myself: the media guy or the press pitcher.”
When working as a Career Coach at Barton Career Advisors we ask our coaching clients to work on developing their story or three minute “mission statement”. The client can practice and perfect their Personal Brand with us before going to the interview so they feel more confident and well versed in their unique selling proposition to “wow” the employer into looking no further for qualified applicants. The client will sell themselves so the employer will decide that the most desirable and valuable applicant is sitting right in front of them.
For many people, personal brands and selling yourself can be a foreign concept or even one that makes us uncomfortable… “me, a sell-out?” That’s not quite our point. In this post-recession economy, you MUST be able to sell (as in ‘market’ or ‘put out there’) yourself so you’ll get the job you want. And key to this is your ability to develop your brand.
So complete this analogy: Coke is refreshing as Kellogg’s is a good breakfast as I am…
Finish that thought and you’ll have your personal brand.

By Career Transition Coach Andrea Abernethy

In this highly competitive job market, a well written resumé is just one tool necessary to market ourselves into a great new job. As important is the development of a personal brand.

What’s that? Think about Coke, Kellogg’s Cereals, American Express or any successful company. All these brands convey a message that helps to define them. And that’s what you need to become memorable and perhaps more importantly, to stand out among the other candidates for that job you’re chasing.

A personal brand can develop from our own mission statement. It can serve as a tagline that tells the interviewer or employer what makes us different, why we are special and desirable, and why we are the best choice over other applicants with similar backgrounds and experience. Just like Coke conveys an energy pick-up and Kellogg’s says cereal, so our brand must convey who we are and how we benefit a prospective employer.

Now use your brand to market yourself.

When developing our personal brand we should be thinking about what we want to achieve in a new job and think about what companies and positions we will be targeting. In our marketing story we should also be communicating our values and strengths and our short and long term goals. We should include words that characterize our personalities and are memorable to the employer. Communicate what makes us stand out and what sets us apart from the other applicants being interviewed for the same position.

Our brand should also include information about our skills, abilities, education, and professional experiences. Our passion and personality should show through in our statement. The personal brand may also include adjectives or descriptions of how we are perceived by friends and acquaintances and how coworkers would describe us.

So how about an example? “Early in my public relations career, I created a brand for myself (unknowingly then) based on my ability to tell stories through the news media and to build positive relationships with the press,” explains Ed Weirauch, one of our Barton Career Transition Coaches. “Without realizing it at that time, I had created a brand for myself: the media guy or the press pitcher.”

When working as a Career Coach at Barton Career Advisors we ask our coaching clients to work on developing their story or three minute “mission statement”. The client can practice and perfect their Personal Brand with us before going to the interview so they feel more confident and well versed in their unique selling proposition to “wow” the employer into looking no further for qualified applicants. The client will sell themselves so the employer will decide that the most desirable and valuable applicant is sitting right in front of them.

For many people, personal brands and selling yourself can be a foreign concept or even one that makes us uncomfortable… “me, a sell-out?” That’s not quite our point. In this post-recession economy, you MUST be able to sell (as in ‘market’ or ‘put out there’) yourself so you’ll get the job you want. And key to this is your ability to develop your brand.

So complete this analogy: Coke is refreshing as Kellogg’s is a good breakfast as I am…

Finish that thought and you’ll have your personal brand.

Tagged: personal brandpersonal brandingcareer transitioneducationadvicetake chargepromotion

22nd July 2014

Photoset

Conservatives say the U.S. has done enough to create equality for blacks. Young liberals agree.

One last dip into a big Pew survey we’ve been discussing on the politics and policy views of Americans. Pew surveyed more than 10,000 adults earlier this year on topics ranging from their views of Hillary Rodham Clinton to taking the bus, and the report divides their responses along a set of political typologies that group respondents into generally coherent categories across the range of policy issues: i.e., the “business conservative,” the “solid liberal,” the young “next generation left.”

Across that spectrum, there is not surprisingly wide disagreement on racial progress in America and the steps government still must take to achieve it. Most of the results on this chart are fairly predictable: Conservatives broadly believe that the government has pretty much done all it needs to to ensure equal rights for blacks. Liberals, with one striking exception, overwhelmingly disagree:

The views of young, affluent liberals stand out. In fact, they align more closely with conservatives than other liberal groups. So what’s going on here? Are younger liberals so far removed from the Civil Rights era that they’ve become disconnected from the memory of overt discrimination it sought to end? Perhaps this cohort, which strongly supports gay marriage, believes that the front in the fight for equality has moved on to new beneficiaries?

We know that the “next generation left” does support affirmative action (as do, notably, majorities of every typology other than the two most conservative):
It’s possible, though, that young liberals support affirmative action more as a means to create diversity than to redress discrimination. In this next chart, 68 percent of the “next generation left” believe that blacks themselves — and not discrimination — are mostly responsible for their own failure to get ahead:

The vast gap between solid liberals and steadfast conservatives on this question is striking (these results also provide context to the widely divergent and passionate responses to Ta-Nehisi Coates’ Atlantic cover story this spring making the case for reparations). But so too is the gap striking between solid liberals — a group that’s highly educated, urban and well-off — and their younger “next generation” counterparts.

Another potential factor is that the “next generational left” is much more likely to say that government can’t afford to do more to help the needy (56 percent) than solid liberals (12 percent). And so perhaps their views on what changes government might still make to create equality for blacks are colored by their skepticism that government can afford to do more.

Of course, another explanation is that the lifetime of younger liberals has encompassed less discrimination than their parents and grandparents saw. But evidence suggests that discrimination — even if we now see subtler forms of it — has by no means disappeared. A more revealing question might grant people the chance to answer that both discrimination and personal responsibility play a role, to varying degrees. Perhaps we’d see then that young liberals believe discrimination persists, just to a lesser degree than in the past.

Tagged: povertyinequalityinequityeducationracismracisthigher education

22nd July 2014

Photoset reblogged from Propaganda War with 24 notes

propagandawar:

SOURCE: Scream the News, https://www.facebook.com/ScreamTheNews

Tagged: wake upwakeuppay attentionconsciousnessconscious?mediapropaganda

22nd July 2014

Photo with 6 notes

Wu Tang Forever

Wu Tang Forever

Tagged: wuwu tangwu tang clanwu tang foreverwzylogo

22nd July 2014

Photo with 2 notes

Tagged: independence daybritishtruth