Finance Professional, Conscious Black Man, Grad Student.
Observing the world. Organizing my Thoughts.
Educating, Sharing and Informing what I see.
This is my Blog. Thank you for Visiting.

17th September 2014

Quote reblogged from DollieRose with 138,485 notes

You attract the right things when you have a sense of who you are.
— Amy Poehler (via chanelbagsandcigarettedrags)

Source: splitterherzen

17th September 2014

Photo reblogged from *Black ; No Cream.No Sugar.* with 21,903 notes

marvelousmission:

yup. it’s atrocious.

marvelousmission:

yup. it’s atrocious.

Source: marvelousmission

17th September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Vietato Fumare with 8,001 notes

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

eccentricsoul:

blackourstory:

FOR THOSE OF YOU WHO ASKED …

Yes, White Men had plenty of disregard and disrespect to go around. 

And for those of you who are wondering when and How the Irish Became White in America…

Tbh I don’t even understand how Jews claim White.

How Did Jews Become White Folks (.pdf)

Source: blackourstory

17th September 2014

Photo

Utah shooting: ‘Disgusting we have to worry about police,’

Darrien Hunt family still doesn’t know why he was carrying his brother’s sword around — a metallic replica with a dulled edge they’d bought several years ago at a Chinese novelty shop.

Hunt, the child of a black father and white mother, was a fan of the animated TV series “Afro Samurai,” whose main character is a black swordsman voiced by Samuel L. Jackson. Hunt’s aunt, Cindy Moss, said the music-obsessed 22-year-old, “a kid still at heart,” may have had a reason for carrying the replica around.

"We think he was looking for a job that day," Moss told the Los Angeles Times. "He got dressed up, took off, thought he could win a job at Panda Express by doing dance moves with a ninja-katana-sword thing."

Hunt died Sept. 10 after officers in Saratoga Springs, Utah, who had received a call about his carrying a sword in public, confronted him and then shot him to death.

Hunt’s case became the latest fatal police shooting to trigger national  scrutiny after independent autopsy results on Saturday raised questions about officials’ account of the confrontation, in which they said Hunt had lunged at officers with the sword.

Hunt’s family says those autopsy results show he was shot six times, including once in the back, and they want to know whether race was a factor — a question that, Moss said, leaves Hunt’s mother afraid for her surviving son and two daughters. The city is predominantly white.

"I watch my sister now in panic every time the kids walk out the door," said Moss, growing emotional as she talked of Susan Hunt and her children. "I wouldn’t want them to leave my sight after all this, but we can’t lock them down because we’re worried somebody might kill them. It’s disgusting we have to worry about police officers."

In a statement, Saratoga Springs Police Chief Andrew Burton said he could not provide more information about the incident because it was under investigation by the county. He also apologized for remarks posted on the department’s official Facebook account that criticized the media for pursuing ratings instead of facts after Hunt’s death.

"We ask the media and the public for patience and understanding of our position and lack of ability to answer all the questions posed at this time," Burton said.

It could take at least six weeks for investigators to determine whether the two still-unidentified Sarasota Springs officers wrongfully killed Hunt, an official told The Times on Monday. Both officers have been placed on paid leave pending the result of a county investigation.

Tim Taylor, chief deputy in the Utah County Attorney’s Office, which is reviewing the case, told The Times it would take that long to get full autopsy results back from the state’s medical examiner office, which declined to comment Monday.

Taylor also said the claim that Hunt lunged at officers with the sword “actually came from a couple witnesses there at the scene.”

The incident between Hunt and the officers appeared to involve two locations, Taylor told The Times. The first encounter happened outside a credit union, he said, where Hunt may have pulled his sword on the officers and a single shot may have been fired. 

"I don’t know if he was hit in that initial encounter," Taylor said, adding that Hunt was killed about 100 yards away, outside the Panda Express.

Taylor said that he didn’t know if the officers had body cameras or dashboard cameras, and that investigators were collecting surveillance video from nearby businesses.

Moss, who has been speaking on behalf of Hunt’s family, told The Times that the independent autopsy requested by the family showed that Hunt was shot twice in the hip, once in the right wrist, once in the shoulder, once in the back of his left arm and once in the back.

The family’s attorney declined to identify the pathologist who conducted the procedure or to provide a copy of the autopsy report to The Times.

Moss said that Hunt did not have psychological problems and called him a “bright, smart kid” who was “not violent.” She said he had been arrested in January after getting in a fight with his sister and two of her friends, but that because he was an adult, he was the only one charged. Moss said Hunt had taken a plea in abeyance, a move that allows charges to be cleared after a year of good behavior.

Moss, who is white, said she once believed racial bias didn’t really exist anymore in America, especially in Utah; but after the shooting and after she saw someone following her surviving nephew around, she said her perspective had changed.

"It seems like if it’s anyone different, we’re all terrified, we want to watch them," Moss said.

The family has since set up a memorial Facebook page for Hunt, which contains links to a fundraiser to help the family pay for Hunt’s burial and a petition for police departments to add civilian review boards.

Utah shooting: ‘Disgusting we have to worry about police,’

Darrien Hunt family still doesn’t know why he was carrying his brother’s sword around — a metallic replica with a dulled edge they’d bought several years ago at a Chinese novelty shop.

Hunt, the child of a black father and white mother, was a fan of the animated TV series “Afro Samurai,” whose main character is a black swordsman voiced by Samuel L. Jackson. Hunt’s aunt, Cindy Moss, said the music-obsessed 22-year-old, “a kid still at heart,” may have had a reason for carrying the replica around.

"We think he was looking for a job that day," Moss told the Los Angeles Times. "He got dressed up, took off, thought he could win a job at Panda Express by doing dance moves with a ninja-katana-sword thing."

Hunt died Sept. 10 after officers in Saratoga Springs, Utah, who had received a call about his carrying a sword in public, confronted him and then shot him to death.

Hunt’s case became the latest fatal police shooting to trigger national scrutiny after independent autopsy results on Saturday raised questions about officials’ account of the confrontation, in which they said Hunt had lunged at officers with the sword.

Hunt’s family says those autopsy results show he was shot six times, including once in the back, and they want to know whether race was a factor — a question that, Moss said, leaves Hunt’s mother afraid for her surviving son and two daughters. The city is predominantly white.

"I watch my sister now in panic every time the kids walk out the door," said Moss, growing emotional as she talked of Susan Hunt and her children. "I wouldn’t want them to leave my sight after all this, but we can’t lock them down because we’re worried somebody might kill them. It’s disgusting we have to worry about police officers."

In a statement, Saratoga Springs Police Chief Andrew Burton said he could not provide more information about the incident because it was under investigation by the county. He also apologized for remarks posted on the department’s official Facebook account that criticized the media for pursuing ratings instead of facts after Hunt’s death.

"We ask the media and the public for patience and understanding of our position and lack of ability to answer all the questions posed at this time," Burton said.

It could take at least six weeks for investigators to determine whether the two still-unidentified Sarasota Springs officers wrongfully killed Hunt, an official told The Times on Monday. Both officers have been placed on paid leave pending the result of a county investigation.

Tim Taylor, chief deputy in the Utah County Attorney’s Office, which is reviewing the case, told The Times it would take that long to get full autopsy results back from the state’s medical examiner office, which declined to comment Monday.

Taylor also said the claim that Hunt lunged at officers with the sword “actually came from a couple witnesses there at the scene.”

The incident between Hunt and the officers appeared to involve two locations, Taylor told The Times. The first encounter happened outside a credit union, he said, where Hunt may have pulled his sword on the officers and a single shot may have been fired.

"I don’t know if he was hit in that initial encounter," Taylor said, adding that Hunt was killed about 100 yards away, outside the Panda Express.

Taylor said that he didn’t know if the officers had body cameras or dashboard cameras, and that investigators were collecting surveillance video from nearby businesses.

Moss, who has been speaking on behalf of Hunt’s family, told The Times that the independent autopsy requested by the family showed that Hunt was shot twice in the hip, once in the right wrist, once in the shoulder, once in the back of his left arm and once in the back.

The family’s attorney declined to identify the pathologist who conducted the procedure or to provide a copy of the autopsy report to The Times.

Moss said that Hunt did not have psychological problems and called him a “bright, smart kid” who was “not violent.” She said he had been arrested in January after getting in a fight with his sister and two of her friends, but that because he was an adult, he was the only one charged. Moss said Hunt had taken a plea in abeyance, a move that allows charges to be cleared after a year of good behavior.

Moss, who is white, said she once believed racial bias didn’t really exist anymore in America, especially in Utah; but after the shooting and after she saw someone following her surviving nephew around, she said her perspective had changed.

"It seems like if it’s anyone different, we’re all terrified, we want to watch them," Moss said.

The family has since set up a memorial Facebook page for Hunt, which contains links to a fundraiser to help the family pay for Hunt’s burial and a petition for police departments to add civilian review boards.

Tagged: darrien huntpolice shootingutahblack experiencebiracialracial profilingThe black threathandsupdontshootdirty cops

17th September 2014

Photo reblogged from Watch That Black Girl Fly with 12,207 notes

Source: my-teen-quote

17th September 2014

Quote reblogged from Life Of The Twisted with 133,019 notes

Everyone’s fucked up. You’ve just gotta decide what kinda fucked up you’re into.
— (via strikerium)

Source: kushandwizdom

17th September 2014

Photo with 13 notes

GOP Gov. Bobby Jindal: Racism Wouldn’t Exist If Minorities Would Just Act Like White PeopleIt’s incredibly pathetic and sad when a politician with so much promise decides to pander to the most hateful elements in our society. In the aftermath of the 2012 election, Louisiana Republican Governor Bobby Jindal declared that the GOP needs to “stop being the stupid party.” However, that moment of sanity, and Jindal’s political career, went down in flames on Sunday after he blamed minorities for racism in America, claiming that racism wouldn’t exist if they would just forget about who they are and start acting more like white people.

In an op-ed published by Politico, Jindal lashed out at minorities to mark the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. Instead of standing up against the many acts of racism that have been perpetrated by his own party and by conservatives around the nation, Jindal declared that minorities are responsible for the racism in this country.

“We still place far too much emphasis on our ‘separateness,’ our heritage, ethnic background, skin color, etc. We live in the age of hyphenated Americans: Asian-Americans, Italian-Americans, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, Cuban-Americans, Indian-Americans, and Native Americans, to name just a few. Here’s an idea: How about just ‘Americans?’ That has a nice ring to it, if you ask me. Placing undue emphasis on our ‘separateness’ is a step backward. Bring back the melting pot. There is nothing wrong with people being proud of their different heritages. We have a long tradition of folks from all different backgrounds incorporating their traditions into the American experience, but we must resist the politically correct trend of changing the melting pot into a salad bowl. E pluribus Unum.”

To translate, it appears Jindal is actually blaming minorities for causing white people to be racist towards them, and is calling on minorities to end racism by conforming to American life as white people see it. In short, minorities should be more like white people if they want racism to stop.

So rather than call out the blatant racism of his own party, Jindal essentially decided that he’d be better off committing political suicide by pandering to the racists within the GOP to curry favor with them as we move toward 2016. 

This is yet another example of a Republican blaming victims for their own oppression. In reality, racists will not stop being racists if minorities decide to do as Jindal suggests. That’s because racists hate minorities simply because of the color of their skin, and that includes Jindal, which is why he doesn’t have a snowball’s chance in hell of ever capturing his party’s nomination for president.

Hypocritically enough, not even a day went by before Jindal violated his own call to action and proudly accepted being referred to as the first Indian-American Governor by David Gregory on “Face The Nation.”

Racism isn’t getting worse in America because minorities aren’t trying to act more white. It’s getting worse because a major sect of the Republican Party is clinging to their own Southern heritage, specifically the part where slavery, segregation, and legal discrimination were completely acceptable. Because of many policies in GOP-controlled states, minority communities have been isolated and basically segregated within the law. 

From ThinkProgress:

In urban areas like Chicago, the poverty rate and median income for black families is also about the same as it was in 1963. Even segregation, once vanquished by the civil rights movement, is rebounding aggressively. Since 2001, urban schools and neighborhoods have become increasingly re-segregated through lax integration enforcement and so-called “white flight.” Research shows this resegregation intensifies poverty and violence in minority neighborhoods, trapping black families in an endless cycle. Jindal himself has helped this trend along in New Orleans with his school privatization plan, which has worsened racial inequality in 34 historically segregated public schools and, according to the Justice Department, “reversed much of the progress made toward integration.”Voter suppression efforts and a general attack on the major Civil Rights Era legislative initiatives have made it even clearer that racism isn’t being perpetrated by minorities; it’s being perpetrated by the very party to which Jindal belongs. Yet he claims all of this will get better because, “if you want people to like you, a good place to start is to demonstrate that you like them.” That’s what Jindal told the GOP as advice on how to attract minority voters. Except that Republicans not only rejected Jindal’s words, they stuffed them in a burn barrel and lit them up without so much as lifting a finger to show they actually care about the plight of minorities. 

Jindal is naïve enough to believe that Republicans consider black people Americans, even though Republicans have, time and time again, referred to President Obama as not being an American. To the GOP, President Obama’s skin color means he’s foreign and “not one of us.” And Republicans are actually making minorities feel less like Americans by stripping them of their right to vote.

It is astounding that Jindal does not understand this. But that’s what happens when you’re desperate to gain the approval of your own party. You’ll say or do just about anything, even if it insults the very minority group you belong to. And that won’t ever change until the GOP has been sidelined from governance for multiple generations in every state in America.

GOP Gov. Bobby Jindal: Racism Wouldn’t Exist If Minorities Would Just Act Like White People

It’s incredibly pathetic and sad when a politician with so much promise decides to pander to the most hateful elements in our society. In the aftermath of the 2012 election, Louisiana Republican Governor Bobby Jindal declared that the GOP needs to “stop being the stupid party.” However, that moment of sanity, and Jindal’s political career, went down in flames on Sunday after he blamed minorities for racism in America, claiming that racism wouldn’t exist if they would just forget about who they are and start acting more like white people.

In an op-ed published by Politico, Jindal lashed out at minorities to mark the 50th anniversary of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s “I Have A Dream” speech. Instead of standing up against the many acts of racism that have been perpetrated by his own party and by conservatives around the nation, Jindal declared that minorities are responsible for the racism in this country.

“We still place far too much emphasis on our ‘separateness,’ our heritage, ethnic background, skin color, etc. We live in the age of hyphenated Americans: Asian-Americans, Italian-Americans, African-Americans, Mexican-Americans, Cuban-Americans, Indian-Americans, and Native Americans, to name just a few. Here’s an idea: How about just ‘Americans?’ That has a nice ring to it, if you ask me. Placing undue emphasis on our ‘separateness’ is a step backward. Bring back the melting pot. There is nothing wrong with people being proud of their different heritages. We have a long tradition of folks from all different backgrounds incorporating their traditions into the American experience, but we must resist the politically correct trend of changing the melting pot into a salad bowl. E pluribus Unum.”

To translate, it appears Jindal is actually blaming minorities for causing white people to be racist towards them, and is calling on minorities to end racism by conforming to American life as white people see it. In short, minorities should be more like white people if they want racism to stop.

So rather than call out the blatant racism of his own party, Jindal essentially decided that he’d be better off committing political suicide by pandering to the racists within the GOP to curry favor with them as we move toward 2016.

This is yet another example of a Republican blaming victims for their own oppression. In reality, racists will not stop being racists if minorities decide to do as Jindal suggests. That’s because racists hate minorities simply because of the color of their skin, and that includes Jindal, which is why he doesn’t have a snowball’s chance in hell of ever capturing his party’s nomination for president.

Hypocritically enough, not even a day went by before Jindal violated his own call to action and proudly accepted being referred to as the first Indian-American Governor by David Gregory on “Face The Nation.”

Racism isn’t getting worse in America because minorities aren’t trying to act more white. It’s getting worse because a major sect of the Republican Party is clinging to their own Southern heritage, specifically the part where slavery, segregation, and legal discrimination were completely acceptable. Because of many policies in GOP-controlled states, minority communities have been isolated and basically segregated within the law. From ThinkProgress:

In urban areas like Chicago, the poverty rate and median income for black families is also about the same as it was in 1963. Even segregation, once vanquished by the civil rights movement, is rebounding aggressively. Since 2001, urban schools and neighborhoods have become increasingly re-segregated through lax integration enforcement and so-called “white flight.” Research shows this resegregation intensifies poverty and violence in minority neighborhoods, trapping black families in an endless cycle. Jindal himself has helped this trend along in New Orleans with his school privatization plan, which has worsened racial inequality in 34 historically segregated public schools and, according to the Justice Department, “reversed much of the progress made toward integration.”

Voter suppression efforts and a general attack on the major Civil Rights Era legislative initiatives have made it even clearer that racism isn’t being perpetrated by minorities; it’s being perpetrated by the very party to which Jindal belongs. Yet he claims all of this will get better because, “if you want people to like you, a good place to start is to demonstrate that you like them.” That’s what Jindal told the GOP as advice on how to attract minority voters. Except that Republicans not only rejected Jindal’s words, they stuffed them in a burn barrel and lit them up without so much as lifting a finger to show they actually care about the plight of minorities.

Jindal is naïve enough to believe that Republicans consider black people Americans, even though Republicans have, time and time again, referred to President Obama as not being an American. To the GOP, President Obama’s skin color means he’s foreign and “not one of us.” And Republicans are actually making minorities feel less like Americans by stripping them of their right to vote.

It is astounding that Jindal does not understand this. But that’s what happens when you’re desperate to gain the approval of your own party. You’ll say or do just about anything, even if it insults the very minority group you belong to. And that won’t ever change until the GOP has been sidelined from governance for multiple generations in every state in America.

Tagged: bobby jindalLouisianagovernorrepublicanconservativeright wingGOPracismracistwhite supremacysegregationgerrymanderingeducationpovertyblack experienceindian americanracial politicspolitics

17th September 2014

Photo with 1 note

16th September 2014

Quote reblogged from Vietato Fumare with 16 notes

you can’t hate the roots of a tree & not hate the tree, you can’t hate your origin and not end up hating yourself
— (via trill-coolie)

Tagged: treesrootsvinevine dresserreflectionfoundationself acceptanceself actualizationconscious?

Source: trill-coolie

16th September 2014

Post reblogged from A Young Black Queen Trying To Live & Love with 212,786 notes

lotrlockedwhovian:

baby-dahlia:

Here’s the thing about being pro choice that people don’t get…
You don’t have to morally agree with abortion to be pro choice. That’s why it’s not called pro abortion. It’s an understanding that you can’t make that choice for someone else and they have full control over that not you. It’s pro I’m not the boss of everyone else.

This is important.

Tagged: moralityethicseducationpro choicepro abortion

Source: